In a June interview with the Christian Science Monitor, Democratic Socialist and presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) said the following:

A guy named Adolf Hitler won an election in 1932. He won an election, and 50 million people died as a result of that election in World War II, including 6 million Jews. So what I learned as a little kid is that politics is, in fact, very important.”

As a matter of history, Hitler did not win an election in 1932.  Hitler rose to power through deception and political manipulation, not the popular vote.  But the larger point of Sanders’ comments is that voting counts and elections have consequences.

He’s right, and last night proved it.  The conservative underdog won handsomely in KentuckyHoustonians resoundingly rejected a city ordinance to give transgendered persons access to the bathrooms of their opposite sex.  In Ohio, according to the Associated Press, “voters rejected a ballot proposal Tuesday that would have legalized both recreational and medical marijuana in a single stroke … About 65 percent of voters opposed the measure, compared to 35 percent in favor.”  In “Progressive” San Francisco, “Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi lost his re-election bid late Tuesday to challenger former Chief Deputy Vicki Hennessy after an uproar over his sanctuary city policy, which was blamed for the death of a woman in July at the hands of an illegal immigrant … Ms. Hennessy won with 74,522 ballots casts versus Sheriff Mirkarimi at 40,128.”

But not all the elections were so lopsided, and therein lies a reminder and a warning: Voting counts.  Consider the Commonwealth of Virginia, where the loss of a single Republican seat would have given liberal Gov. Terry McAuliffe a free hand in the state senate in order to enact what the Washington Post calls “an unabashedly liberal agenda.”

Conservatives should – must – take note.  Next year’s national election will be critical to the future of our country.  If America gets a liberal president and/or a liberal majority in the Senate, everything we cherish with respect to the sanctity of life, the definition of marriage, the nature of the family, and the religious liberty that undergirds all our other freedoms, not to mention myriad economic, military, and foreign policy matters, could well be adversely and profoundly affected such that it might take America decades, or longer, to recover.

This is probably the only time I will ever publicly commend Sen. Sanders for a political stance, but when a person’s right, he’s right. 

Citizenship is a trust.  Voting counts.  Elections matter.