Author archives: Patrina Mosley

10 Reasons Why We Marched for Life

by Patrina Mosley

January 22, 2018

This year marked the 45th annual March for Life to protest the Roe v. Wade decision that changed the course of human dignity in America forever. Forty-five years ago, seven Supreme Court justices ruled that it was perfectly legal, and in fact a right for a mother to kill her own child in the womb. The first March for Life was just a year after this 1973 decision and advocates for the right to life haven’t stopped marching since! 

Unlike the Women’s March, which had no clear purpose or goals (and if you were not a liberal, pro-choice, secular humanist who didn’t vote for Trump, you were not welcomed), advocates for life gathered for a purpose that extends beyond Trump Derangement Syndrome.

Here are ten reasons why we marched for life:

    1. Life is precious and we are made in the image of God. That image gives glory to God. Genesis 1:26-28 shows that people, human beings, are the crown of God’s creation because He patterned our design after himself. God did this for nothing else in His creation. We have His attributes and divine involvement in the procreation of life and all its stages. Psalms 139:13-16 beautifully records:
      “For you formed my inward parts; you knitted me together in my mother’s womb. I praise you, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are your works; my soul knows it very well. My frame was not hidden from you, when I was being made in secret, intricately woven in the depths of the earth. Your eyes saw my unformed substance; in your book were written, every one of them, the days that were formed for me, when as yet there was none of them.”

      Through this intimate account by the psalmist David, we see the attributes and glory of God as being all-powerful, all-knowing, and always present. This account only affirms what modern science can tell us today about the development of a baby in the womb.

    2. The abortion industry was built on a genocidal philosophy, and this philosophy is still succeeding today. Martin Luther King wasn’t the only one with a dream. The dream of Margaret Sanger, founder of Planned Parenthood, was to weed out what she called “the unfit” from society. This included the poor, the sick, the disabled, and minorities. In her own plans to market to the “unfit,” she cautioned, “We don’t want the word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population.” Today, over 79 percent of Planned Parenthood facilities are located within walking distance of black or Hispanic neighborhoods. Coincidence? I think not. Though abortion industry advocates might tell you that they are just concerned and want to provide access to those who are most vulnerable to unintended pregnancies or economic hardship, there is a reason this type of family planning started in these communities and continues to this day. How is it that the African-American community has been a part of this country as early as the 1600’s and represent less than 13 percent of the population today? This is true systemic racism.
    3. Abortion masquerading as “healthcare” is the biggest lie in America right now. Abortion poses an undisputed risk to women’s physical and mental health. After an abortion, it’s not uncommon to develop blood clots, hemorrhaging, and infection due to injury to the cervix. Abortion also increases the risk of breast cancer and premature births. Immediate medical complications affect approximately 10 percent of women undergoing abortions, and approximately one-fifth of these complications are life-threatening.
    4. The emotional and psychological harm done to women due to abortion is overwhelming—we must protect them both. The risk of suicide is three times greater for women who aborted than women who have not. Forty-two percent of women who aborted their child reported major depression by the age of 25. In a recent study done on 987 post-abortive women, only 6.6 percent of respondents reported using prescription drugs for psychological health prior to the first pregnancy that ended in abortion, compared with 51 percent who reported prescription drug use after the first abortion. A pro-life activist shared a statement she heard from post-abortive women that still sticks with her today: “Not a day goes by when the first thought that comes to my mind upon waking is ‘I actually PAID someone to kill my child.’”
    5. Abortion is neither empowerment nor a blessing. Abortion destroys life, glamorizes selfishness, enables reckless behavior, brings emotional trauma to both the man and the woman, and places an endorsement of complacency in building families.
    6. Convenience or coercion from others to abort a child does not determine inherent value or worth. Of the 987 women who participated in the study from above, 58.3 percent of the women reported aborting their child “to make others happy,” while 73.8 percent disagree that their decision to abort was entirely free from even subtle pressure from others to abort. A person’s value and worth should not be determined by if they are wanted or even healthy, but simply by being made in the image of God, and with that comes a plan for their life and the lives they will impact.
    7. It’s the right thing to do. To know the right thing to do and not do it is sinful and wrong for us to ignore (James 4:17). The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. even said: “The time is always right to do what is right.” Abortion is the most horrific injustice we could ever see—killing someone before they even have a chance to breathe. An estimated 60 million children have been extinguished from our society due to abortion.
    8. The hundreds of thousands who come to the March for Life annually have the power to change the hearts and minds of the American people, which can ultimately lead to changes in policy. Because we haven’t given up, we’ve seen massive pro-life legislation passed at the state level, and much of this legislation is gaining momentum at the federal level. On the day of the 45th March for Life, we saw the U.S. House of Representatives pass H.R. 4712, the Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act, which would require any health physician present to administer life-saving care to a child who survived an attempted abortion. We also saw the biggest showing of White House support for the pro-life movement than ever before! For the second year in a row, Vice President Mike Pence addressed the crowd, stating “My friends, life is winning in America because Love Saves Lives,” referencing the theme of this year’s March for Life. Also, for the first time ever in American history, a sitting president, Donald J. Trump, visually addressed the March for Life. He said: “Americans are more and more pro-life… In fact, only 12 percent of Americans support abortion on demand at any time. Under my administration, we will always defend the very first right in the Declaration of Independence, and that is the right to life.”
    9. Because we love. The March for Life is one of the most selfless acts of compassion one can be a part of. Not only are you marching to save lives, but you are marching to remember the lives that are no more—many of whom you don’t even know. But that doesn’t matter because all you need to know is that it was a life—a life that was taken for the sake of profit and a mother who is now left to deal with the emotional trauma. We love them both, and that love compels each of us to march and be the defenders of life and the broken.
    10. We are not alone. At the March for Life, you get to see other people from all different backgrounds from across the country, even from other parts of the world, that value life just like you and are willing to brave the cold and go the distance to see the sanctity of life restored. It’s a brotherhood and sisterhood of a love of another kind. At this March, you didn’t have to be a “Never-Trumper,” a Republican, a religious person, or heterosexual. People from all walks of life were united in a simple belief: that every life has value and was created just as God intended, and therefore deserves justice.

Why We Can’t Wait: A Call for MLK-like Leadership

by Patrina Mosley

January 16, 2017

I have tried to stand between these two forces, saying that we need emulate neither the “do nothingism” of the complacent nor the hatred and despair of the black nationalist…if they refuse to support our nonviolent efforts, millions of Negroes will, out of frustration and despair, seek solace and security in black nationalist ideologies—a development that would inevitably lead to a frightening racial nightmare.”

- Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Letter from Birmingham Jail (1963), Why We Can’t Wait

These are powerful and prophetic words from the late Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., words that should be heeded today; for we can no longer wait to wake up from this racial nightmare that we are now in where black liberation ideologies are being foisted on the minds of young Americans. A teacher’s organization is encouraging teachers to provide Black Lives Matter (BLM) curriculum in the classroom one day every week, along with wearing BLM apparel. One teacher who has gotten on board with this agenda says “Black Lives Matter functions with 13 principles that I think are good and healthy for kids to learn about.” Considering what the Black Lives Matter movement has publically stated, this is a frightening prospect. Instead, children should be learning about the inspiring leadership of Dr. King, whose philosophy and principles we have all benefited from today. BLM is the very “black nationalist” ideology he warned would try to fill the void for truth if left vacant.

The Black Lives Matter movement states that they are “a chapter-based national organization working for the validity of Black life and “to (re)build the Black liberation movement” (emphasis added). What does that mean? To answer that we need to look at who the Black Liberation movement was. The Black Liberation movement, more commonly known as the Black Liberation Army (BLA), was a splinter group developed after the Black Panther Party dissolved. Their four badges of honor were anti-capitalism, anti-racism, anti-sexism, and anti-imperialism. Secondly, they proclaimed “That we must of necessity strive for the abolishment of these systems and for the institution of Socialistic relationships in which Black people have total and absolute control over their own destiny as a people (emphasis added). This is essentially a description of black anarchy. Third, “in order to abolish our systems of oppression, we must utilize the science of class struggle, develop this science as it relates to our unique national condition” (emphasis added). In other words, perfect the science of profiting at being a victim of society. The Black Liberation Army was reported to be involved in numerous police shootings and murders throughout the 1970’s.

Black Lives Matter also emphasizes the same social and economic struggles as the Black Liberation movement once did, calling its members to “live Black and buy Black” to create wealth only in the black community. Black Lives Matter has also extended the Black Liberation Army’s interest in being “anti-sexism” by affirming “the lives of Black queer and trans folks, disabled folks, Black-undocumented folks, folks with records, women and all Black lives along the gender spectrum. It centers those that have been marginalized within Black liberation movements. It is a tactic to (re)build the Black liberation movement” (emphasis added).

One of their core principles of being Queer Affirming states, “We are committed to fostering a queer-affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinking or, rather, the belief that all in the world are heterosexual unless s/he or they disclose otherwise” (emphasis added). Sadly, the movement seems to be against the family model that is the foundation of society.

BLM also seems to be wholeheartedly committed to what they call “disrupting the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and ‘villages’ that collectively care for one another…” A kind of America where innumerable government community programs are substituted for moral values taught by a mom and dad, perhaps?

The guiding principles of this movement take the African-American community in a downward spiral of black anarchy that erases the family and casts no vision for a sustainable future. These principles are neither good nor healthy and are vastly different from the successful principles of Dr. King.

The most successful model for social change we can draw from is itself the civil rights movement of the sixties, led by the late Dr. King. He was able to articulate what the real problems were and to cast a unifying vision for all Americans to move forward. Dr. King also called the collection of his brave volunteers an army, but “an army whose allegiance was to God … it was an army that would sing but not slay … no arsenal except its faith, no currency but its conscience.”

Dr. King took universal Christian principles that inherently speak to every human conscience and used them to make a crisis of conscience to promote action. He made sure the world televised his non-violent marches for the enforcement of equal rights, while dogs and water hoses were unleashed on their bodies, knocking them to ground only to be beaten down more with clubs and fists. The world saw the participants of these non-violent marches singing praises to God and stopping together to sink to their knees on the pavement to pray.

Dr. King led the fight for civil rights by calling for action through policy, not burning down buildings. After the 1956 Supreme Court ruling that overturned Alabama’s bus segregation laws, King co-founded the Christian Leadership Conference throughout the South which became the leading organizer for action in the civil rights movement. after many arrests, non-violent marches, sit-in’s and appeals, his leadership paved the way for the passage of the Civil Rights Acts of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and a Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.

What an astonishing difference King’s efforts have made. His movement has largely accomplished its goals, and we are alive to see it in beautiful ways today, from the first black president, to multi-ethnic families and churches, to endearing friendships that would have never taken place had segregation existed today. Why are we enjoying the success of the MLK movement today and not the BLA? I believe the answer is that any social movement not based on Christian principles cannot be sustained and will fail. Christianity operates in truth and is a benefit to all people, no matter one’s color, gender, or culture.

Dr. King cast this vision, stating:

This is our hope, and this is the faith that I go back to the South with. With this faith, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith, we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.”

We must be the voice of truth and fill the void. We cannot afford to wait, hoping things will just get better. Our destination should be what it was always meant to be, “to sit at the table of brotherhood.”

For this was God’s eternal and mysterious plan since the beginning of mankind according to Ephesians 3, where the apostle Paul explains God’s advanced plan to make one unified body out of diversity, which displays His wisdom. Any plan that inherently goes against this will not succeed and cannot be blessed by God. We should seek out policies of righteousness and justice just as Dr. King so diligently fought for. Today we honor him and his contributions to all Americans, and pray that leaders like him will take up the mantle to be the alternative and distinct Christian voice for truth and justice. 

FRC Action Blog blog_goto
ICE: Unsung Heroes or Anti-Immigrant?
by Emily Weatherholt (July 11, 2018)

Throughout the years, ICE has created alternatives for detention programs, created apps to help prevent child exploitation on the internet and track children that have been abducted by sex trafficking ...

Instagram ig_follow