Category archives: States

Three Pro-Life State Measures, One Massive Effect on the Country

by Alex Yun

November 5, 2018

Midterm elections have typically been regarded as a referendum on the incumbent president and congressional majorities. The nation usually looks to key Senate and House races to see who will attain the majority. However, state elections, especially ballot measures to amend Constitutions, are often overlooked. For me, growing up in the state of Oregon, midterms typically meant a fair amount of disappointment, as conservatives and pro-lifers normally have a tough time winning in the Pacific Northwest. In fact, I can’t remember the last time that a conservative or a Republican won a major election in my home state. Both Senators from Oregon, Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden, are some of the most left-leaning Democrats in the Senate today—both have a 0 percent rating with FRC Action in Congress’ last session.

Similarly, my Republican congressional candidate has consistently been outvoted by the liberal cities in my district. While there may not be many choices for elected office for pro-lifers in the Pacific Northwest to get excited about, you might be surprised to hear that Oregon voters will have an opportunity to vote for a pro-life ballot initiative this election: Measure 106.

Oregon Measure 106 would amend the Oregon Constitution to prevent taxpayer funds from paying for abortions, with a few exceptions. The ballot language states: “The state shall not spend public funds for any abortion, except when medically necessary or as may be required by federal law.” If the measure attains a majority of votes, Oregon will become the 27th state to make state health care funded abortions illegal. This would be a massive victory for pro-life voters. Oregon is one of the most lenient states in the country when it comes to abortion. Unlike the majority of other states, Oregon allows partial birth abortions, has no waiting period, has no limit on how old the baby is at the time of the abortion, and allows minors to receive abortions without a parent’s consent. Oregon doesn’t even require that the person performing the abortion be a licensed physician. Thus, Measure 106 would be a potent tool in stemming the tide of one of the United State’s most radically pro-abortion states. 

Oregon isn’t the only state with a pro-life ballot measure before the voters. Two other states, Alabama and West Virginia, have measures of their own on the 2018 ballot. Alabama’s Amendment 2 makes it state policy to “recognize and support the sanctity of unborn life and the rights of unborn children, including the right to life,” it “ensures the protection of the rights of the unborn child,” and states that “nothing in this Constitution secures or protects a right to abortion.” Similarly, West Virginia’s Amendment 1 adds language to their Constitution stating that “nothing in this Constitution secures or protects a right to abortion or requires the funding of abortion.” If either or both of these measures pass, it will send a strong signal to the rest of the nation that outlawing abortion is something that is possible—if Roe v. Wade is overturned.

In the event that Roe is overturned, Alabama and West Virginia’s proposed amendments would make it that much easier to make abortion illegal in those states. Similarly, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Dakota, and South Dakota all have laws which would make abortion illegal the second that Roe is overturned, and nine more states have bans on abortion that even predate Roe. Seven more states intend to ban abortion should the case be overturned. Even if these amendments have no affect for years to come on their own, they would become the highest laws in each state if or when Roe is overturned.

Liberals are, understandably, appalled at this idea. Vox reports that they are “quite confident that Kavanaugh is a vote to overturn Roe” and that “[a]fter that point, all bets are off.” Similarly, Hillary Clinton tweeted the following:

If Brett Kavanaugh becomes a Supreme Court justice, will he help gut or overturn Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion in America? Yes, of course he will. 

The Left is scared to death that Roe v. Wade could be overturned. That’s because they know that keeping the Supreme Court is the only way they can ensure abortion remains legal. Should Roe be overturned, the question will then become a state issue. Imagine the message it would send to the nation if voters in Alabama, Oregon, and West Virginia were able to pass pro-life amendments to their state constitutions. How many states would then be emboldened to pass similar measures themselves? How many lives would be saved? In the end, every vote for pro-life legislation is a step toward an America in which all life is cherished and loved as it was intended to be.

Alex Yun is an intern at FRC Action.

The Forgotten Impact of State Authorities

by Emily Weatherholt

June 27, 2018

Later this year, gubernatorial elections will occur across the country, in which individuals have the opportunity to shape the future of their states in both the governor and lieutenant governor positions. However, statistics show that turnout for these elections drops by over 30 percent when compared with voter turnout during presidential elections. While Kentucky, California, New York, and many other states are also experiencing voter percentages dropping for local elections, let’s focus on Virginia’s statistics. Virginia’s Department of Elections Board reports that in 2016, 72 percent of registered voters turned out to the polls to vote in the presidential election. However, the years both before and after the election year show diminishing results. In 2015, only 21 percent of registered voters participated in local elections, and in 2017, only 47.6 percent of registered voters participated in local elections.

These statistics show the emphasis that has been placed on presidential elections over state elections. As the federal government has become involved in more and more aspects of our lives, the influence of the state is being forgotten. The millennial generation, which is known for wanting to make a positive impact, composes a large majority of the current voting population that is not participating in state elections. While change on a federal level may have the most widespread results, voters today are forgetting the tremendous opportunity they have by being able to influence their own state legislation.

In the case of the upcoming state governor elections, voters have the chance to influence the path their state will follow for the next four years. Each state government is modeled after the workings of the federal government. The state governor has the authority, in a majority of states, to appoint the state judiciary, to control the executive budget, and to enforce a legislative veto. Over the course of two or four years, many new laws can be enacted and enforced that either strengthen or weaken an individual’s freedom.

An example of this is a state’s ability to pass a Government Nondiscrimination Act, which would ensure religious liberties relating to the biblical definition of marriage are protected. While the case of Obergefell v. Hodges proclaimed the constitutional right to same-sex marriage, the states retain the power to ensure that Christians and other religious people are not forced to affirm this definition of marriage in their lives and businesses. Participation in state elections allows individuals to advocate for their states to protect their rights and avoid being penalized for holding to a biblical definition of marriage.

The Founding Fathers originally determined that state government should have more power than the federal government. If participation and understanding of the importance of state elections were recognized by more of the voting population, decisions such as Roe v. Wade could have been tempered in their influence, for voters would elect politicians seeking to limit the expansiveness of how abortion is practiced. As governor and lieutenant governor elections fast approach, the burden is on the people to shape the future of their state and make a change, as many millennials desire. This can be achieved by contacting local officials and participating in the upcoming governor and lieutenant governor elections.  

Emily Weatherholt is an intern at FRC Action.

See FRCA’s new ad on the Texas Privacy Act

by FRC Action

August 10, 2017

Family Research Council Action (FRC Action) launched a video ad campaign across Texas that exposes the hypocrisy of corporations that are opposing the special session legislation that protects the privacy and safety of women and children.

FRC Action’s social media ad campaign calls on House Speaker Joe Straus, Rep. Byron Cook and other Texas State Representatives (Dennis Bonnen, Charlie Geren, Ken King, John Kuempel, and Chris Paddie) to listen to their constituents and support the Texas privacy legislation instead of listening to corporations such as American Airlines and Google which advocate for bathroom policies that they will not adopt in their own facilities. The hypocrisy begs the question, “Why is big business getting involved in the state government?”

Last week, the Texas State Senate passed the bill which prevents public schools and government buildings from adopting policies that would open women’s showers, bathrooms, and changing facilities to men and visa-versa. It also prevents political subdivisions from forcing businesses and organizations, including contractors, to open their showers, locker rooms, and bathrooms to people of the opposite sex. It leaves private entities free to determine their own policies regarding the use of shared bathrooms and showers.

Here is the transcript of the “Big Business Hypocrisy” Ad:

They say ‘Don’t mess with Texas,’ right?

So, why is big business getting involved in the state government?

Well, you probably know the Trump administration left the states the power to determine the shower, locker room, and restroom policies of schools.

Smart move.

So, during the regular session, the Texas Senate passed the Privacy Act, which would have protected the privacy and safety of women and children.

The act is simple.

It would have required schools and state buildings to have policies that require people to use the facility that corresponds to their biological sex and to make accommodations for those who identify as transgender. It would have left businesses free to adopt whatever policy they want.

So, what’s the big deal?

Well, big business is demanding Texas expose women and children to policies that could endanger them in the most private of places… by allowing men into women’s restrooms and locker rooms.

But those same businesses like Hilton, Marriott, La Quinta, American Airlines, Google, and others refuse to enact the same unsafe policies in their own facilities… even though they are free to do it.

It’s hypocrisy.

Call House Speaker Joe Straus. Urge him to stop blocking a strong shower, locker room, and bathroom privacy bill from getting a House vote.

Will Speaker Straus side with the Obama administration’s radical agenda, or listen to the overwhelming number of Texans who support the commonsense Texas Privacy Act?

Click your representative’s name below to watch the ad and tell him to support the Texas Privacy Act:

Rep. Byron Cook
Rep. Chris Paddie
Rep. Dennis Bonnen
Rep. John Kuempel
Rep. Ken King
Rep. Charlie Geren
Speaker Joe Straus

FRC Action Blog blog_goto
Terri Schiavo and the Slippery Slope of Assisted Suicide
by Worth Loving (May 23, 2019)

...

Instagram ig_follow